Bioenergy Contributes To Forest Health, Rural Jobs Across America

On Bioenergy Day and during National Forest Products Week, we recognize the importance of using domestic biomass for a wide variety of applications: renewable energy, heating and cooling, and biobased products, to improve forest health, mitigate climate change, and create jobs in rural America. The undersigned groups, representing a wide array of interests, also recognize […]

On Bioenergy Day and during National Forest Products Week, we recognize the importance of using domestic biomass for a wide variety of applications: renewable energy, heating and cooling, and biobased products, to improve forest health, mitigate climate change, and create jobs in rural America.

The undersigned groups, representing a wide array of interests, also recognize the importance of holistic solutions to mitigate the effects we are already seeing in U.S. forests due to climate change. Using excess biomass resources that are produced from existing forest management activities as well as wastes from the forest products sector supports forest health while reducing wildfire risk. These activities also create economic opportunity for rural America in the form of local jobs and economic activity.

While deforestation is a pressing global concern, the forested landmass of the United States has stayed stable for the past 100 years, despite a tripling of population growth, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Nevertheless, U.S. forests still face pressing threats from climate change, pests, and urbanization. Sustainable biomass utilization can help support forest health while creating economic incentives to keep land forested.

Woody biomass has been referred to as a “Goldilocks” renewable – use too much, and we risk undue harm to ecosystems and forests. Use too little, and we risk having overstocked forests that are unhealthy and at increased risk of wildfire. Today, many forestry scientists argue that we’ve entered a “too little” scenario in which many U.S. forests are overstocked — due to years of wildfire suppression — and unhealthy because of the proliferation of invasive species and pests.

From producing long-lived building materials that sequester carbon, to generating renewable heating, cooling, and energy in local communities, smart biomass utilization can support the interrelated goals of forest health, forest carbon sequestration, water and air quality, creating and maintaining jobs, as well as keeping forests healthy for Americans’ enjoyment and recreation.

Read more on this from Advanced Biofuels USA at https://advancedbiofuelsusa.info/alternative-fuels-home-grown-bioenergy-contributes-to-forest-health-and-rural-jobs-across-america/.

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